Egg freezing: Should you preserve your fertility?

21st May 2015 in Fertility

New statistics show that egg freezing has become the most popular fertility treatment in the UK, with demand up by over 400% in the past 12 months.

But is egg freezing suitable for you? At Manchester Fertility, we can offer egg freezing as a method of fertility preservation.   

This starts with us looking at your fertility status through a number of simple tests including an anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) test, which gives us a good indication of the potential number of eggs in your ovaries, and your likely response to the stimulation needed for egg-freezing.

If the tests show you’re suitable to proceed, we’ll explain to you very honestly the likely chances of pregnancy using your thawed eggs in future. We will always be open with you about whether we feel egg freezing is an option for you, based on your individual test results.

Pregnancy from thawed eggs are influenced by a number of factors, including your age at the time of egg retrieval as the younger you are, the higher the quality of the eggs that are being preserved. It may be that your age means that egg freezing isn’t suitable. 

Pregnancy is also influenced by the number of eggs we retrieve, how successfully they survive the freeze-thaw process, how many are fertilised and how many quality embryos are available for transfer.

For our patients who egg freeze, to help ensure your eggs survive the freeze-thaw process we freeze eggs via a state-of-the-art method called vitrification or ‘flash freezing’, which dramatically improves the survival of eggs. In the UK, you can store your eggs with us for up to 10 years, but in certain circumstances this can be extended. Eggs do not deteriorate over time in any way, as they are stored in liquid nitrogen at -180 degrees.

If you’re interested in fertility preservation through egg freezing, make an appointment with us on 0161 300 2737. We can test your fertility status and will advise you on whether it’s an appropriate option for you to conceive in future.

Last updated: 20th May 2015