Search for ‘low progesterone’ - Showing 1-12 of 15

Blood test results

I have just had my results back from a blood test and my Serum progesterone level was 56.2. I have read that a week after ovulation a women should be at about 20.

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

High progesterone level is good, so there is no need to worry about this. If progesterone is measured low (less than 20 pmol/L), it suggests no ovulation. So a level of 56.2 is really good.

Low progesterone on clomid....what next?

Advice please... I'm 30, diagnosed with mild endometriosis and failed to concieve after 9 months - I had only 3 temp shifts on charting and egg on clearblue monitor, with luteal phases of 11dpo. I was started on 50mg clomid for 3 months and day 21 progesterones were 27 month 1 and 2 but had egg on monitor every month with 11dpo luteal phase. I was told this was borderline for ovulation and started on 100mg and discharged back to GP but now my day 21 is only 20! Am I definately not ovulating with those progesterone levels? What can I do next? Do you think I should stop clomid or do I need progesterone supplements? Many thanks, Emma

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

From the information you have given me you have a short luteal phase and low progesterone levels which could suggest a luteal phase defect (LPD).  I would recommend ovulation induction (Clomid and hCG) and intrauterine insemination with ultrasound control.  I would also advise blood tests to determine your thyroid function and prolactin levels.

AMH 3.4 and Progesterone 21 day test

Hi I’m 43 I’ve just had my AMH blood test result and it’s 3.4 which I know is low but can I still try to get pregnant through IVF with my own eggs? I was pregnant 12 years and 23 years years ago. I need to go for a progesterone 21 day test but my 21st day falls on a Sunday and the clinics are closed. Can I go the day before or after?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

You can still get pregnant  with IVF aged 43  with a low AMH.  The low AMH means that you will not produce many eggs in the IVF process and will probably be prescribed a higher dose of fertility drugs to stimulate your ovaries. 

Having been pregnant before is positive even though it was a long time ago.

If you are having a day 21 progesterone test you should check with your clinic as the day depends on your normal cycle length.

Nothing has happened

We have been trying now for over a year and nothing has happened. I have very regular periods and when I do ovulation tests they come back positive, but my progesterone blood tests are always less than zero. Could it be that ovulation tests can work and you still don't ovulate even with a regular cycle?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

I presume when you write “progesterone less than zero” you mean the values are in the low, non-ovulatory range. I would recommend progesterone blood tests 7, 9, and 11 days after ovulation sign. In case of abnormal findings I would suggest that you have monitored ovulation induction treatment (usually Clomid). It is also important to check your partners semen quality before considering fertility treatment.

Shortening Menstrual Cycle

I'm 35 and have been trying to conceive 2nd child for 18 months, I have had 2 early miscarriages in that time. My cycles have been getting shorter and shorter gradually. They used to be around 28 days, but last two cycles have been 22 days. I ovulate around day 9 or 10. I've read this can been a sign of low egg quality, but my GP wants me to wait another 6 months before any testing. I'm worried I'm running out of time.

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

There is no clear link between shorter cycles and low egg quality. The advice you have received from your GP is good and you should carry on trying. If you wish to have some investigations  I would advise a day 21 progesterone test ( 7 days after ovulation) to assess if you have any luteal phase insufficiency and an AMH test to assess your ovarian reserve.  If your luteal phase progesterone is low then you can be prescribed progesterone support. 

Natural Killer Cells

Do you offer NK cells testing and if so what is the cost?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

Here at Manchester Fertility we don't offer routine Natural Killer cell testing as, - in line with the opinion from the HFEA - it has no proven benefit. Some of our patients are faced with recurrent implantation failure and early miscarriages where we use a standard quad therapy (high dose progesterone, low dose steroid and heparin and low dose aspirin). In some cases we cooperate with Professor Quenby in Warwick who is a renowned scientist of this field.

Low morphology and high fsh


My FSH is 13 and progesterone 68. My husband's morphology is 6. Is IVF our only hope?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

You have always got a chance of conceiving naturally while you are still producing eggs but IVF would give you more information about your egg and embryo number and quality.  Your ovarian reserve (number of eggs in your ovary) may be low if your FSH is 13 but further tests here at Manchester Fertility would give you a clearer picture.  Your age is the most important factor in determining your chance of success. 

Very low AMH

I am 42 years old with an AMH of 1.7 pmol/l. I am still ovulating, have regular cycles and all other hormone tests i.e. Prolactin, FSH, LH, Oestradiol, Progesterone etc are all normal. I was told the best chance for me is IVF. Would IUI on a natural cycle be a waste of time for me with these results or is there still a good chance I could get pregnant through IUI/donor insemination?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

To see what your chance would be with IVF you need an ultrasound scan to measure your antral follicle count. In case of low number of astral follicles (<4), low dose, modified natural IVF is recommended whereas higher count can respond to intensive, high dose IVF and this provides a better chance of success. Intrauterine insemination gives very low chances of conception in your age group.

Fertility treatment - gonadotrophin injection with clomid?

I'm 40 years, have two kids, the youngest one is 4 years. I have been trying to get pregnant for the last two years. My tubes are open. My doctor gave me clomophine tablets100mg but there was no response. Then he put me on 150mg which help me to ovulate in two sequence months, then on the third month I failed to ovulate with very low progesterone level. Is it possible for me to have gonadotrophin injection with clomid?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

My advice to you is to have a test for AMH (Anti Mullerian Hormone) which will give an indication of your ovarian reserve. The AMH result can then determine the most effective treatment to help you achieve a pregnancy.

Two follicle of 20mm but not pregnant

I am 37 years old. I had test from NHS on the basis (whole process wasted two years) and they said it is unknown reason of fertility initially. They said my husband's results are ok. I was told AMH is low and only donor eggs will work. I had taken clomid of few months and my progesterone results were good. Meanwhile I travelled to Pakistan where I had some stimulating hormones not clomid as it was late in the cycle and day 14 scan showed 2 follicles of 20mm. I have to travel in the same week and I did not get pregnant. I am asking my GP to refer me to private treatment. What chances do I have as I do not want to use donor eggs?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

It is very difficult to discuss your best option without having access to all you medical history. I would suggest having a consultation with one of our doctors and they will be able to advise you.

AMH 1.1, but this is my only poor test result. What will happen now?

I am 38 (39 in November) and we are trying for our first child. All my tests are perfectly fine. Low FSH (about 6, from memory), Progesterone of 41. Everything else fine. Except for low AMH of 1.1. I believe I have a cyst of 1.7cm on my left ovary, but no cause for concern. I didn't listen well enough to my follicle count. I think it was 4 and 5, but I can't be sure. I was just trying not to cry at this point.

I have been referred on the NHS the The Priory in Birmingham, but I have to wait 2 or 3 months until I get an appointment there. I am panicking as my consultant said they might not do IVF with an AMH that low, but that is my only bad score. I desperately want my own children, with my wonderful partner. I do not want to use donor eggs. I cannot afford to pay for private treatment. Am I going to be fighting a losing battle?

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

AMH, FSH and AFC (antral follicle count) are different tests to measure the same. They are not always consistent and do not indicate chances of natural conception. However they are good indicators of IVF pregnancy chances. It is recommended that if you are trying for over 6 months without success, you should complete investigations (semen analysis), fallopian tube testing and a proper medical history. If IVF treatment is indicated, it should be started as soon as possible as your IVF chances may decline in the next 24 months. These investigations and the IVF treatment may be quite time consuming in the NHS so you may want to consider a Fertility MOT.

Immunologic recurrent pregnancy loss

Hello Doctor,
My husband and I have suffered three first trimester losses in a year. The first two ended at week 5, and the third one ended at week 7 after noting a heart beat of 119. Our karyotypes are normal, and the baby was 46xx normal by chromosome microarray analysis without maternal contamination. I have hashimoto's thyroiditis with positive TPO antibodies (500+). My TSH was being managed but at the time of the third pregnancy spiked to 7.1. Using progesterone vaginal suppository 200mg twice daily. Thrombophilia panel was negative. Rh+. No infectious diseases. No uterine issues voiced by our RE. My husband and I are 37 years old with no prior live births. My most recent day 3 FSH was 10.9, AMH was 1.2, Estradiol was 40, and AFC was 7 (trans abdominal day 8.) Semen analysis is normal. Ethnically, I am Caucasian, and my husband is Asian Indian. My RE at Mayo Clinic recommended IVF/PGS. He said he is not concerned about the immunological or endometrial receptivity aspect. I was wondering if you may be able to shed some light on it, and give us your opinion if we need an immunological work up, and if IVF is a sound choice to make given the diminished ovarian reserve?
Thank you.

Read answer

Our Expert's Answer

Please note that all the answers we give are on a generic basis only, as we cannot provide more in-depth answers without access to your medical history. If you need a more detailed response, tailored to you, we would recommend a consultation with one of our Fertility Specialists for more comprehensive medical advice.

With such a low AMH and high FSH, it seems likely the egg quality issue is important with regards to the three miscarriages. T agree that immunological work is not necessary nor endometrial assessment. IVF has very low success rates with such a low AMH, but with Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS), you would be able to identify chromosomally normal embryos so this could be considered.